TCO Fly Shop - Stream Conditions


Our Local Water

We are fortunate to have some of best trout and smallmouth bass fishing available anywhere, right here in Pennsylvania. Here's a view to a little more information about the streams and rivers we call home:


Big Fishing Creek

Fishing Creek originates above the town of Tylersville and flows north east into Bald Eagle Creek at Mill Hall. But the section referred to as the "Narrows" near the town of Lamar, is by far the most popular with anglers. A large spring at the Tylersville’s state hatchery adds a healthy dose of cold, limestone water and the necessary nutrients to produce one of the state’s finest wild brown trout fisheries. Anglers from all over the world come to fish this stream and its abundant hatches. Wildlife encounters are common within Big Fishing Creek’s beautiful, untamed, heavily shaded valley. White tail deer, black bears, turkeys, coyotes, and rattle snakes are a possibility anytime an angler decides to fish the "Narrows" Fishing Creek’s dynamic geology enables anglers to fish varieties of water types more commonly found in freestone streams--from fast flowing riffles, to runs, and slow, glassy pools. Wild Brown trout up to 16 inches and native brook trout up to 12 inches are also caught in this section. But fishing during the famed green drake hatch, or high-water streamer conditions, can produce the occasional leviathan brown trout--this is where Joe Humphreys caught his state record brown trout while night fishing. Fishing Creek is often the most productive Central Pennsylvania trout fishery during periods of extreme summer heat and low water. Click Here to review the current fishing report for Fishing Creek.
Fishing Report

Fishing Creek Fishing Report

River Overview

Fishing Creek Overview

Hatch Chart

Fishing Creek Hatch Chart

Little Juniata River

The Little Juniata River, a 35 mile tributary of Juniata River, begins humbly in Altoona when several small streams merge. Known locally as the "Little J" or simply the "J", the river flows northeast from Altoona through the Logan Valley. This part of the river is a freestone fishery for predominantly stocked trout, but that changes quickly when the Little J bends sharply southeast at the town of Tyrone. Below Tyrone, the Little Juniata flows against high limestone cliffs and receives in-flows from dozens of large limestone springs which cool the river and add nutrients. The river‘s deep, chalky-green pools and numerous riffles create the perfect environments to grow truly large trout. The J is a beautiful river, dotted with hand-cut stone railroad arches. But it becomes particularly scenic below Spruce Creek‘s convergence, as it flows through the roadless "gorge" section within Rothrock State Forest. 13.5 miles of the Little Juniata River, from the bridge at Ironville to its confluence with the Frankstown Branch near Petersburg, is regulated as All Tackle Catch and Release. This special protection ensures that the river‘s wild brown trout are able to thrive and attain proportions that are uncommon in the Northeastern U.S. In addition to the wild trout, Pennsylvania stocks 30,000 brown trout fingerlings into the river each year. But these fish quickly adapt to their surroundings and by the time they reach 10 to 12 inches (average size), it‘s impossible to differentiate between the truly wild trout and the newly "wild" stocked fish. Click Here to review the current fishing report for the Little Juniata River.
Fishing Report

Little Juniata Fishing Report

River Overview

Little Juniata River Overview

Hatch Chart

Little Juniata Hatch Chart

Spring Creek

Totally confined within Pennsylvania’s Centre County, Spring Creek begins life at the base of Tussey Mountain, near the village of Boalsburg. Spring Creek is Pennsylvania’s premier brown trout fishery with more wild fish per mile than any other stream in the state. Limestone feeder creeks--Cedar Run, Slab Cabin Run, Logan Branch, and Buffalo Run (wonderful wild trout streams in their own rights)--supplement cold, fertile, limestone water to Spring Creek’s already trout-friendly flows. Spring’s most productive water flows north, for 20 miles, to its confluence with Bald Eagle Creek at the town of Milesburg. But populations of both wild and stocked trout thrive far below this point. Trout average 10-12 inches, but do not let these smaller fish fool you. Spring maintains a good trout population from 13-20 inches and larger! The entire stream, from its source to its mouth, is catch and release, ensuring that these fish will stay in the stream, ready to challenge your skills. Legendary anglers George Harvey, Joe Humphreys, and Charlie Meck have called this water home. Come armed with your best nymphs, dry flies, and streamers and see if your skills can match those of the Pennsylvania masters. Click Here to review the current fishing report for Spring Creek.
Fishing Report

Spring Creek Fishing Report

River Overview

Spring Creek Overview

Hatch Chart

Spring Creek Hatch Chart

Penns Creek

Penns Creek’s 35 miles of trout water make it Pennsylvania’s longest limestone trout stream. Many people associate Penns Creek with Penns Cave--Pennsylvania’s only water cavern, where tourists glide through the dripping darkness in long, metal, motor-powered boats. The stream exiting the cave, called "Upper" Penns Creek, is small--averaging 15 to 30 feet wide. This is the coldest section of Penns Creek, and though the state stocks this section with rainbow trout, very good numbers of wild brown trout are also present. Upper Penns flows for approximately 13 miles from Penns Cave to the town of Coburn, where it is met by two pure limestone streams, Elk and Pine Creeks--fine wild brown trout fisheries in their own rights--which widen Penns from 75 to 100 feet across. Another important addition at Coburn is the maze of rocks, boulders, and gravel that fill the stream bed from this point downstream, providing excellent habitat for trout and aquatic insects. Nearly every species of caddis, stonefly, and mayfly that exist in the eastern U.S. lives in Penns Creek, creating a hatch-matching paradise. This 11 mile section, downstream to Weikert, is rated Class A wild trout water--Pennsylvania’s highest designation--and it is not stocked. Trout average 12-13 inches but 14-16 inch fish are common and larger fish are a real possibility. Much of Penns below Coburn is rimmed by Bald Eagle State Forest’s 195,624 acres. This vast tract of wild, public land provides beautiful scenery and a wealth of wildlife. Click Here to review the current fishing report for Penns Creek.
Fishing Report

Penns Creek Fishing Report

River Overview

Penns Creek Overview

Hatch Chart

Penns Creek Hatch Chart

Spruce Creek

Spruce Creek is known as the trout stream of Presidents. Many have come to fish its chalky limestone water which teems with huge brown and rainbow trout. But perhaps the most well-know is Jimmy Carter who continues to make pilgrimages to Spruce Creek each year. Spruce Creek is the Little Juniata River’s largest tributary, but unlike the "J" nearly all of Spruce is privately owned. Penn State University maintains a small half mile stretch that is open to the public, but that’s where the open water ends. TCO can put you in touch with the few landowners that offer access (rod fee required) however we prefer to focus on the many quality rivers that offer excellent trout fishing in a more natural setting.
Fishing Report

Spruce Creek Fishing Report

River Overview

Spruce Creek Overview

Hatch Chart

Spruce Creek Hatch Chart

Big Spring

Big Spring Creek is fishing more like a wild trout stream since the hatchery has been closed. The catch and release fly fishing only stretch of 1.1 miles remains, starting 100 feet downstream of the source (Big Spring) downstream to the Nealy Road Bridge. Below that is open regulated water and you can now find trout downstream of what was locally known as the "ditch". The stream on the rebound with plenty of trout to be found within the catch and release water and good angling below the project water. The stream is filled with some stream-bred rainbows and brown trout and the population of stream-bred brook trout is also on the rebound. Click Here to review the current fishing report for Big Spring.
Fishing Report

Big Spring Fishing Report

River Overview

Big Spring Overview

Hatch Chart

Big Spring Hatch Chart

Letort Spring Run

The LeTort Spring Run is named after James LeTort, a French-Swiss trader who settled near the headwaters of the stream in the early 18th century. In the 18th and 19th centuries, numerous mills and tanneries were located along the stream's banks. Later, the stream became internationally known for cold-water fly-fishing. LeTort Spring Run is one of the finest limestone trout streams in the nation, known for large wild browns that are particularly wily. This iconic stream was also the first stream featured on the companion TV series to the book Fifty Places to Fly Fish Before You Die. While hatches are not as heavy and the run no longer produces the large fish it used to, you can still catch some really beautiful fish on the stream. The fish are very wary and the fishing presents a challenge for the most accomplished fly fisher, the stream and the history that surrounds it is worth the trip. Click Here to review the current fishing report for Letort Spring Run.
Fishing Report

Letort Spring Run Fishing Report

River Overview

Letort Spring Run Overview

Hatch Chart

Letort Hatch Chart

Yellow Breeches

The world-renowned limestone stream, Yellow Breeches Creek, originates on South Mountain, in Michaux State Forest, Cumberland Valley, near Walnut Bottom. From there, the Yellow Breeches meanders through Cumberland Valley’s farmland, forested areas and suburbs, and joins the Susquehanna River near New Cumberland. The main stem of the Yellow Breeches is some 49-miles long & 60-feet wide at its middle stretch. The most popular catch and release section is a mile long and runs through Allenberry in Boiling Springs. Designated as a "Pennsylvania Scenic River", Yellow Breeches never has a shortage of trout (mix of stocked and wild trout). TCO is located in the heart of Boiling Springs, within walking distance of some of the best water on this historic river. Click Here to review the current fishing report for Yellow Breeches Creek.
Fishing Report

Yellow Breeches Fishing Report

River Overview

Yellow Breeches Overview

Hatch Chart

Yellow Breeches Hatch Chart

Falling Springs

The Falling Springs is one of three designated limestone wild trout fisheries, and fly fisherman nationwide recognize the Falling Springs as one of the best limestone waters in the East. The Falling Springs with its constant water temperatures makes for a great year round fishery. Most of the Falling Spring flows through picturesque meadows. The stream is blessed with a diversity of mayflies, caddisflies and midges and prime water for summer terrestrial fishing. The Falling Springs has a great population of wild rainbows. Many reaching lengths of 20+ inches. There is also a very good population of wild brown trout, but they are seldom seen or caught because they are very wary. The downtown section is full of both stocked browns and an increasing population of wild rainbows and brown trout. Call us for more information about Falling Springs.

Tulpehocken Creek

Tulpehocken Creek is an outstanding tailwater fishery located just outside of Reading, Pennsylvania. The dam creating Blue Marsh Lake was erected by the Army Corps of Engineers in 1978 is managed as a flood control project and also is used to regulate salinity in the Delaware River Estuary in summer months with unusually low water. The bottom release dam also happens to discharge cool and fertile water from depths of up to 50 feet which keeps the Tulpehocken Creek cool enough for trout to survive. In fact, the trout in Tulpehocken Creek thrive in the almost 4 miles of water below the dam, with heavy brown and rainbow trout averaging between 12-14 inches. The Tulpehocken Creek (the "Tully") is also influenced by two tributaries which help cool the lower stretches of the stream during the hottest summer months. Plum Creek enters the Tully just below Rebers Bridge providing cooling waters and, for small stream enthusiasts, an interesting diversion to the Tully during certain times of the year or when the Tully is not fishable due to high water. Cacoosing Creek provides an even greater boost of cooling water to the Tully beside the Paper Mill at the junction of Tulpehocken Road and Paper Mill Road. The Cacoosing adds a good volume of 55 to 60 degree water to the Tully and also can provide a fishing alternative if the Tully is running high. Tulpehocken Creek is float stocked with brown and rainbow trout. Tully holdover brown and rainbow trout average 13 to 16 inches with a few over 18 inches. Click Here to review the current fishing report for the Tulpehocken Creek.
Fishing Report

Tully Fishing Report

River Overview

Tully River Overview

Hatch Chart

Tully Hatch Chart

Valley Creek

This little gem lies just minutes from Philadelphia yet feels a world away. Take a trip back in history, where Washington and Lafayette were headquartered during the Revolutionary War. Three miles of the lower end of Valley Creek lie within the boundary of Valley Forge National Park. While this productive limestoner has been dealt at least three major blows with polution that would have killed most streams, Valley is thriving. It is no longer stocked and now thousands of wary streambred browns are spread throughout 13 miles of beautiful water. The Valley Forge Chapter has devoted thousands of dollars and hours to preserve the fishery. The result is improved spawning habitat, stream stabilization and additional work of a two critical tributaries. The stream is typically low and clear so anglers will meet a challenge on Valley however the scenery and the beautiful brown trout serve as a wonderful reward. Click Here to review the current fishing report for Valley Creek.
Fishing Report

Valley Creek Fishing Report

River Overview

Valley Creek Overview

Hatch Chart

Valley Creek Hatch Chart

Susquehanna River, Juniata River and Schuylkill River

Experience Fly Fishing for Smallmouth Bass on the Beautiful Susquehanna River and Juniatia River in South Central Pennsylvania. The Susquehanna River and Juniatia Rivers are fertile limestone influenced rivers home to one of the best smallmouth fisheries in the East. These majestic rivers are rich in food, with rocks and wide shallow riffles laden with nymphs, crayfish, and other foods. This environment ensures prolific hatches and rapid growth rates for both forage and game fish. If you have never experienced smallmouth fly fishing, you really need to get out and try it. The Schuylkill River and the Conodoguinet Creek offer additional smallmouth opportunities in the region. Please do yourself a favor and get out to experience big bass on dry flies with our expert guides. Check out smallmouth fly fishing conditions on the Susquehanna River, the Juniata River or the Schuylkill River.
Fishing Report

Susquehanna River Fishing Report

Fishing Report

Juniata River Fishing Report

Fishing Report

Schuylkill River Fishing Report




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Our Local Water

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